The best need-blind HSIs

Need-blind admissions mean a college doesn’t factor your financial situation in admissions decisions. You may still have to submit a FAFSA or CSS profile to find out what financial aid package you are eligible for. Need-blind is an attempt to focus on students’ academic merit rather than socio-economic background in college applications. Find below our rankings of the best need-blind Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) in the U.S. To learn more about how we rank schools, read our ranking description.   

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Net cost: The median annual cost of all students that receive any aid. This does not refer to the “sticker price”, the price listed by the college.

Earnings: The median earnings of all bachelor-level students 10 years after enrollment. This includes both students that do and do not graduate, across all majors.

Payback: The amount of time in years it takes to pay off the median net cost by the median earnings. For this calculation, the median earning of high school graduates (in the school’s home state) are deducted from the median earnings.

Earningsplus: The difference between the school’s median earnings and the median earnings for all schools in the same state.

Rankings: The ranking order is based on the economic score. The economic score is calculated using a school’s payback and earningsplus performance.

Net cost
Payback
Earnings
EarningsPlus
Rankings
Ranking methodology
#1 in Need Blind | #21 in Hispanic-serving institutions

San Jose State University

San Jose, California

Economic score: 1.34

The economic score is calculated using two factors: 1) how fast students are able to payback their educational investment with new earnings and 2) how much alumni earn compared to all alumni in the same state, 10 years after enrollment. These two factors are referred to as payback and earningsplus.

These scorings are based on the most recent data released by the U.S. Department of Education’s College Scorecard and the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS).

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Net cost: $14,928

The median net cost of students who receive federal financial aid. This is lower than the price advertised by the school.

Payback: 1.8 years

Average time in years to pay back educational costs.

Earnings: $67,365

Median earnings of all students 10 years after enrollment. Includes students that did not graduate.

EarningsPlus: + $16,686

How much more/less money the median student earns against all bachelor students in the same state, same enrollment year.

Admission rate: 68%
Graduation rate: 75%

Schools with a graduation rate in the bottom 50% in their state are shown in red. Schools in the bottom 25% nationally are put to the end of the ranking list.

#2 in Need Blind | #35 in Hispanic-serving institutions

Fairleigh Dickinson University-Metropolitan Campus

Teaneck, New Jersey

Economic score: 1.74

The economic score is calculated using two factors: 1) how fast students are able to payback their educational investment with new earnings and 2) how much alumni earn compared to all alumni in the same state, 10 years after enrollment. These two factors are referred to as payback and earningsplus.

These scorings are based on the most recent data released by the U.S. Department of Education’s College Scorecard and the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS).

View school
Net cost: $15,147

The median net cost of students who receive federal financial aid. This is lower than the price advertised by the school.

Payback: 2.1 years

Average time in years to pay back educational costs.

Earnings: $55,994

Median earnings of all students 10 years after enrollment. Includes students that did not graduate.

EarningsPlus: + $10,371

How much more/less money the median student earns against all bachelor students in the same state, same enrollment year.

Admission rate: 89%
Graduation rate: 50%

Schools with a graduation rate in the bottom 50% in their state are shown in red. Schools in the bottom 25% nationally are put to the end of the ranking list.